Costa Da Morte, Galicia, Spain

Muxia

Muxia

Legend has it that the dreaded waters of the Costa de la Muerte there are buried ancient mythical cities, and for time eternal, many ships have sunk into the waters around this area.

Costa da Morte or “Coast of Death” is part of the Spanish Galician coast. The Costa da Morte extends from the villages of Fisterra and Malpica.

Costa Da Morte, Galicia, Spain

Costa Da Morte, Galicia, Spain

Since the estuary of Muros and Noia, north coasts are filled with steep cliffs on the sea, endless beaches and open, deserted and often treacherous for swimmers and sailors. De Noia told that was founded by a granddaughter of Noah, Noela, who derives his name and in a mountain of the nearby mountain is buried grandfather built his ark to survive the Flood.

Corme, Costa da Morte

Corme, Costa da Morte

Around the church of Santa Maria: an enigma for historians: on the walls and on the tombstones of many of their graves are hundreds of slabs with inscriptions that are enigmatic figures whose meaning no one has been able to uncover so far. For experts in occult initiation inscriptions it is left there by mysterious visitors who came to Noia in ancient times, perhaps survivors of the lost Atlantis. According to researcher and writer John G. Atienza, the Noah speaking of the legend of the city would be one of them.

Malpica

Malpica

About 12 kilometers to the north is Carnota and near this city is the legendary Monte Pindo, also called the Celtic Olympus, a huge mass of pinkish quartz over the sea in which many found magical Celtic inscriptions.

Monte Pindo

Monte Pindo

From Corcuvion, a little further north, out the road leading to Finisterre, the Finis Terrae of the Romans. According to legend, this area was buried under the waters of the mythical city of Duyo, destroyed by God as punishment for the sins and indifference of their inhabitants after landing the Santiago Apostol. Only two rocks shaped likes an ox remain as a testimony to this event.

Finisterre, Costa Da Morte, Galicia, Spain

Finisterre, Costa Da Morte, Galicia, Spain

On the road to Coruña along the coast, dotted with fishing harbors, hidden beaches and high cliffs, find Muxia. There, facing the sea, stands the baroque sanctuary of the Virgen de la Barca. Nearby, are the stones of miracles, which have formed the ship that he came to the Virgin appearing to St. James. The largest of them, Abaladoira Pedra,  weighs over sixty tons and say that moves and even produces a slight moan as she gets on someone who is completely free from sin, Pedra dos Cadrises, the keel of the boat, pound back pain who pass under it.

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